We’re generally delighted when we see Shiro in the media, and here are just a few clips to date, although this isn’t by any means all the coverage we’ve been promised, based on our Queensland awards success.

We also write our own published pieces, as shown here on the web site of Facilities Management magazine, on the subject of workplace strategy. You can download a copy of the original piece printed in the December 2016 issue of the magazine here.
 

 

First international media recognition

In November 2016, the KDV Golf and Tennis Academy found its way onto the international architectural web site ArchDaily here. We were later long-shortlisted in the top 100 of ArchDaily’s worldwide 2017 building of the year sports facilities.
 

 

The Urban Developer: Commonwealth Games Served It’s First Pro Sports Facility

The Urban Developer followed up with the appalling grammar of its headline in “Commonwealth Games Served It’s First Pro Sports Facility.” This was also inaccurate as the KDV Golf and Tennis Academy, despite being on the adjoining site, is simply not a Commonwealth Games building.

 

Surprise publicity for Shiro in The Canberra Times

On February 24, 2015, Shiro Architects received a welcome and unexpected accolade in The Canberra Times in this piece by its columnist Ian Warden.

Featuring images Hiromi and Selina had produced at the page’s top, Ian wrote about the exhibition Engineers Australia hosted at Canberra’s Gallery of Australian Design of all entries into its 2014 Freefall Experience Design Ideas Competition.

The organisation had invited engineers to design a feature installation for the Engineers Australia Freefall Pin Oak Forest at the National Arboretum in Canberra. We entered the competition with our friend, structural engineer Vesna Spasovski.

Despite being among the runners up, our imagery and story had captured Ian Warden’s imagination sufficiently to supplant those provided by the winner.

Ian wrote, “Great runners-up in the Freefall Experience competition include Egg Sanctum (pictured). The entry, by a team of five including engineer Vesna Spasovski, comes with this delightful and plausible-sounding saga.”

A few days later, I spoke to him and he was very friendly. He told me he’d chosen Shiro’s image because it was very striking and much better than the winner’s, which he said, “wouldn’t have worked at all.” He said he is very interested in making sure he uses strong images for his column, over which he says he enjoys quite a lot of autonomy, so I asked him, was it a “captain’s pick”? He laughed, saying, “Yes, I suppose it was.”
 

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Guardian Australia Culture Blog December 10 2013: Harry Seidler: Australia’s king of concrete and curves

Despite his death in 2006, interest in the life and work of Harry Seidler persists, and Hiromi was interviewed for this piece about his architectural legacy and his lasting influence over the students who worked for him.

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